North Carolina Essentials for Childhood

By Catherine Joyner & Michelle Reis, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health

In 2014, the North Carolina Institute of Medicine, in partnership with the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) Division of Public Health (DPH), convened a statewide Task Force on Essentials for Childhood, tasked with developing a collaborative, evidence-based, public health initiative to address child abuse and neglect prevention and family well-being in North Carolina. The Task Force issued 15 recommendations aimed at improving collaboration and ensuring safe, stable, and nurturing relationships and environments for North Carolina’s children. Continue reading

Faith-Based Community Establishes Church Policies to Battle Cardiovascular Disease Health Disparities in Omaha, Nebraska

Black churches are answering the call to action to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities associated with cardiovascular disease by establishing Policy, System and Environment (PSE) changes. Through an expanded partnership with the Omaha Million Hearts® 2022 in Municipalities Project, the Omaha faith-based community will be able to sustain efforts in reducing cardiovascular disease. Continue reading

NACCHO Exchange Summer 2018: Breastfeeding

The summer 2018 issue of NACCHO Exchange showcases the ways in which local health departments are implementing policy, systems, and environment changes to increase breastfeeding rates in their communities. Below is an excerpt from the issue.

By Emily Bernard, IBCLC, NACCHO Consultant; Harumi Reis-Reilly, MS, LDN, CHES, IBCLC, Lead Program Analyst, Breastfeeding Project, NACCHO; and Nikia Fuller-Sankofa, MPH, MPA, Director, Breastfeeding Project, NACCHO

Breastfeeding in the Community: Using Policy, Systems, and Environmental Change Strategies to Facilitate Continuity of Care

Background
Leading health agencies in the United States recognize breastfeeding as a public health priority, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Public Health Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Suboptimal breastfeeding has significant public health implications. Because human milk contains unreplaceable immunomodulation properties and live substances including antibodies, hormones, and enzymes that are not found in breast milk substitutes, infants who are not breastfed do not receive the same protection against illnesses.1 Not breastfeeding also increases the mother’s risk of several diseases, including breast cancer, ovarian cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2 diabetes. Infants who are not breastfed have higher rates of diarrhea, necrotizing enterocolitis, otitis media, sudden infant death syndrome, obesity, and childhood leukemia.2 Annually, suboptimal breastfeeding contributes to 3,340 excess deaths, with medical costs totaling $3 billion and the costs of premature death totaling $14.2 billion.3 Continue reading

Florida Epidemiologists Combating HAIs by Becoming CIC Certified

By Luz Caicedo, MPH, CPH, CIC and Danielle Walden, MPH, Florida Department of Health in Orange County

In 2018, the Florida Department of Health (Department), Health Care-Associated Infections (HAI) Infection Prevention Program, in collaboration with the Florida Department of Health in Orange County (DOH-Orange), established the HAI Certification in Infection Prevention and Control (CIC) Study Group.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently reported that in 2011 there were an estimated 722,000 HAIs in U.S. acute-care hospitals. Approximately 75,000 of those patients with HAIs died during hospitalization. Public health surveillance, prevention and response are key to reducing the number of HAIs in local communities. Currently, health department involvement in HAI prevention is primarily through surveillance of reportable diseases and conditions as well as HAI outbreak response. According to CDC, outbreaks in health care settings are often attributed to failures in infection control practices or contaminated equipment or medications. It is important for public health staff to be knowledgeable in infection prevention and control. One of the key challenges for HAI prevention and response for public health staff is access to education and training on infection control. Based on a recent survey, 10 out of 104 (9.6%) epidemiology public health staff members in the Department hold the CIC credential. This low prevalence illustrates the need to implement a strategy to increase education and training in infection control for public health staff. Continue reading

Fostering Agency Through Local Public Health

By Grenadier, Andrea, BA; Holtgrave, Peter, MPH, MA; Aldridge, Chris, MSW, NACCHO

This article originally ran in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice.

When public health departments support all aspects of the public’s well-being—beginning with striking at the roots of health inequity—it can create transformational change. Part of this process is encouraging people in communities to determine their own futures, to express agency; something that is rooted in action and power. So, how does local public health get there? Continue reading

2017–2018 NACCHO President Dr. Umair A. Shah Shares Highlights from His Term and Describes How LHDs Can Combat the “#InvisibilityCrisis”

Interview by Lindsay Tiffany, Lead of Publications, NACCHO

On June 30, Umair A. Shah, MD, MPH, Executive Director of Harris County Public Health (HCPH) in Houston, concluded his term as NACCHO President. Dr. Shah is a long-standing and enthusiastic member of NACCHO and has served on a variety of different NACCHO-related groups including the Health Equity and Social Justice Committee, the Global Health Workgroup, the Media Champions Network, and the Finance Committee. He can be found tweeting often from the handle @ushahmd on Twitter. He has served on NACCHO’s Board of Directors since 2014. He recently spoke to NACCHO Voice about his experience as president, the “invisibility crisis” facing local health departments, and what he is looking forward to doing now that his term is over. Continue reading

Minneapolis Health Department Supports a Young Food Entrepreneur

By Dan Huff, Director of Environmental Health, and Gretchen Musicant, Commissioner of Health, Minneapolis Health Department

This story originally ran in NACCHO’s Essential Elements blog.

Jaequan Faulkner, 13, started selling hot dogs in front of his Minneapolis home in 2016, calling his establishment “Mr. Faulkner’s Old Fashioned Hot Dogs.” His food stand came back this summer bigger and better than before, and it grew popular with customers in the neighborhood. Continue reading