Category Archives: Kevin Sumner

NACCHO, ASTHO, and the Surgeon General: Partnering to Build Healthier, More Resilient Communities

By Kevin G. Sumner, MPH, NACCHO President and Health Officer and Director of the Middle-Brook Regional Health Commission in Green Brook, New Jersey

This year, NACCHO is collaborating with the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) and the Office of the U.S. Surgeon General on the ASTHO President’s Challenge. ASTHO President Nicole Alexander-Scott, MD, MPH, Director of the Rhode Island Department of Health, U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, MD, MPH, and I have united to call on state, territorial, local, and tribal health officials to build healthier, more resilient communities by supporting investments in community-led, place-based approaches. The challenge has two specific goals: (1) equipping health officials to mobilize community-led, place-based collectives focused on measurable outcomes to build stronger communities; and (2) connecting public health officials, and their communities, to business leaders and policymakers who want to invest in these community-led, place-based approaches and advance economic development by reaching across sectors. Continue reading

New NACCHO President Kevin Sumner Discusses His Priorities for NACCHO and Shares How He Uses Collaboration and Communication to Gain Support for Local Public Health

Interview by Lindsay Tiffany, Director of Publications, NACCHO

On July 1, Kevin G. Sumner, MPH, Health Officer and Director of the Middle-Brook Regional Health Commission in Green Brook, NJ, became NACCHO’s President. Sumner is a long-time, dedicated member of NACCHO and has served on a variety of advisory groups including the Membership Committee, the Performance Improvement Workgroup, the Finance Committee, and the Public Health Communications Workgroup. He has served on NACCHO’s Board of Directors since 2012. He recently spoke to NACCHO Voice about his career path, the challenges that keep him up at night, and how he helped to successfully advocate to get $10 million for local health department lead activities incorporated into the state budget. Continue reading