Category Archives: health equity

NACCHO Book Club — How to Survive a Plague: The Inside Story of How Citizens and Science Tamed AIDS

By Emily Yox, MPH, Global Health Program Analyst, NACCHO

Each month, we will bring you a new public health book, read and reviewed by NACCHO staff. We hope to provide a well-rounded reading list that you will find enjoyable as well as informative.

December is National AIDS Awareness month. To allow for discussion during that time, our book recommendation for November is a long but engaging read by David France titled “How to Survive a Plague. The Inside Story of How Citizens and Science Tamed AIDS.” It was published in 2016 after the success of David Frank’s documentary by the same name. Continue reading

NACCHO Book Club — Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City

By Emily Yox, MPH, Global Health Program Analyst, NACCHO

Each month, we will bring you a new public health book, read and reviewed by NACCHO staff. We hope to provide a well-rounded reading list that you will find enjoyable as well as informative.

Our second book recommendation, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, was published in 2017 and written by sociologist Matthew Desmond. Evicted follows eight families as they struggle to find and maintain consistent housing in Milwaukee’s low-income rental market. As the book’s website states: “without a home, everything else falls apart.” Desmond explores both the political and cultural systems that create systemic poverty, the role that housing plays in this system, and the significant social and health effects that directly influence an individual’s ability to thrive. Continue reading

Dialogue with Indigent Communities: How the Voice of Public Health Makes an Impact that Matters

Erika S. Corle, MPH, Executive Assistant, Providence St. Joseph Health/St. Mary Medical Center

While finishing this blog post, two major earthquakes struck the very area that I am writing about. These earthquakes were the largest to hit Southern California in the past 20 years, striking Kern and San Bernardino counties. Being a member of the affected community, I can attest to the fear, the unknowing, and the hope that the areas hardest hit would not be left behind or forgotten while larger, more able areas were addressed. Continue reading

Homelessness Among Individuals with Disabilities: Influential Factors and Scalable Solutions

By Erin Vinoski Thomas, MPH, CHES, Health and Disability Fellow, NACCHO; and Chloe Vercruysse, MBA

This post originally ran in NACCHO Essential Elements blog.

People experiencing homelessness lack sustainable access to housing and instead turn to emergency shelters, transitional housing, or places not meant for overnight residence. In the Unites States on a single night in January 2018, 552,830 people experienced homelessness; between 2.5 and 3.5 million people experience homelessness over the course of any given year. Housing is an important determinant of health, and those who experience homelessness are at greater risk for health challenges. Continue reading

Advancing Health Equity and Racial Justice: Emerging Lessons from Los Angeles County’s Community Prevention and Population Health Taskforce

By Manal J. Aboelata, MPH, Deputy Executive Director, Prevention Institute

Across the country, local jurisdictions are employing a variety of tactics to achieve health equity and racial justice. In 2016, as Los Angeles County prepared to integrate the departments of mental health, public health, and health services under a single health agency umbrella, the Board of Supervisors recognized the value in creating an advisory body that would tap into the knowledge and expertise of community-based organizations and LA County residents to elevate priorities, challenges, and opportunities to eliminate gaps in public health outcomes through a focus on the determinants of health and wellbeing. This profile details the early days of the Taskforce, including its efforts to embed community-based health equity perspectives into county decision-making and center racial justice within its focus on health equity. It also outlines the critical role of the local public health department in supporting the Taskforce. The aim of this profile is to provide those in and outside of LA with a snapshot of this nascent effort and emergent lessons for those interested in addressing health equity and racial justice by forging stronger ties between local government decision-makers and diverse organizational and community-based interests. Though it’s too early to claim “success”, this profile sheds light on some of the formative experiences of the Taskforce to inform those interested in testing similar approaches elsewhere and provide background for those seeking to contribute to the effort underway in LA County. Continue reading

Preventing HIV Perinatal Transmission and Congenital Syphilis in Broward County Florida

The following Model Practice was submitted by the Florida Department of Health in Broward County. To access this Model Practice and to view the full application, click here. NACCHO is currently accepting applications for the 2018–2019 Model Practices Program until December 12. Learn more and apply today.

Broward County, Florida has a population of approximately 1.9 million people and hosts an estimated 10 million visitors each year. It is a very diverse community with residents from 200 different countries and nearly 130 languages spoken throughout the county. Minorities account for nearly 59.5% of the population, making it a minority/majority county. Continue reading

Fostering Agency Through Local Public Health

By Grenadier, Andrea, BA; Holtgrave, Peter, MPH, MA; Aldridge, Chris, MSW, NACCHO

This article originally ran in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice.

When public health departments support all aspects of the public’s well-being—beginning with striking at the roots of health inequity—it can create transformational change. Part of this process is encouraging people in communities to determine their own futures, to express agency; something that is rooted in action and power. So, how does local public health get there? Continue reading