Category Archives: general

How Can Public Health Students Make Themselves Competitive for Employment?

The Scholarship of Public Health is a blog series from the Journal of Public Health Management & Practice that addresses topics relevant to scientific publishing, dissemination of evidence and best practices, and the education of current and future professionals. 

As soon as I entered academia, one of the most common questions I received from students was some variation of, “What is the best way to make myself more competitive for a job when I graduate?” To me, there are many answers one can give, and each of them is necessary but not sufficient. One that I most commonly hear is to network, but networking is like marketing, and it’s fruitless to market an inferior product (ask the marketers of “New Coke”). This is not to say that networking, and building contacts, is not necessary, but it’s not sufficient. To me, the answer to the question of marketability is deceivingly simple but often overlooked: demonstrable skills. Both words are important. “Skills” reflects the ability to do something useful, and “demonstrable” represents the fact that they can be observed, most often in the form of a product. Continue reading

Teaching Public Health Practice for Non-Practitioners

By Justin B. Moore, PhD, MS, FACSM, Journal of Public Health Management & Practice

The Scholarship of Public Health is a blog series from the Journal of Public Health Management & Practice that addresses topics relevant to scientific publishing, dissemination of evidence and best practices, and the education of current and future professionals. This column presents some considerations and best practices for finding time to produce scholarship in the form of a manuscript or presentation. Continue reading

A Note to Our Members on Public Health Thank You Day

Dear NACCHO members,

In honor of Public Health Thank You Day, I’d like to extend my heartfelt gratitude to you and your health departments for all that you do to protect and promote the health and resiliency of your communities every day.

The work of local public health is challenging; local health departments confront a range of multifaceted public health issues—everything from infectious disease outbreaks to natural disasters—while providing the indispensable foundational services that enable communities to thrive. This work is often underappreciated and underfunded. Continue reading

Fostering Agency Through Local Public Health

By Grenadier, Andrea, BA; Holtgrave, Peter, MPH, MA; Aldridge, Chris, MSW, NACCHO

This article originally ran in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice.

When public health departments support all aspects of the public’s well-being—beginning with striking at the roots of health inequity—it can create transformational change. Part of this process is encouraging people in communities to determine their own futures, to express agency; something that is rooted in action and power. So, how does local public health get there? Continue reading

Using Disease Intervention Specialists to Improve Linkages and Access to Care

By Carolyn Campbell, Anne Arundel County (MD) Health Department

This story originally ran in NACCHO’s Stories from the Field.

Fifty-percent of people in the United States who are living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) reside in twelve of the nation’s cities. Frequently listed among the top six of these high-morbidity cities are Baltimore and Washington, DC. Anne Arundel County in Maryland is located immediately south of Baltimore, directly east of Washington, DC, and houses the state capital, Annapolis. Maryland ranked third in the United States for HIV diagnoses rates in 2013, and Anne Arundel County ranked fifth among Maryland jurisdictions for percentage of total newly diagnosed HIV cases. In addition, the county has the fourth highest rates of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis infections in Maryland. Anne Arundel is similar to many other counties in Maryland in its proximity to both Baltimore and Washington, DC and in its combination of residents– mixing rural, suburban, and urban populations and having a wide range of income levels. Continue reading

World AIDS Day 2016: Local Health Department Leadership, Commitment, and Impact

By Alyssa Kitlas, HIV, STI, & Viral Hepatitis Program Analyst, NACCHO 

This story originally ran in NACCHO’s Essential Elements blog.

The U.S. Government theme for World AIDS Day 2016 is “Leadership. Commitment. Impact.” These themes resonate strongly with the work local health departments (LHDs) do every day to address HIV in their communities.

LHDs are key leaders in providing and assuring access to HIV prevention, care, and treatment for the communities they serve. As community health strategists, LHDs facilitate collaboration between public health, healthcare, social services, and other key stakeholders, such as community organizations and small businesses, to achieve more integrated and effective systems for HIV prevention and care. Over the past few years, this leadership and collaborative work with community partners has led to the successful development of local and state plans for ending the HIV epidemic, such as those for Fulton County (GA), San Francisco (CA), Houston (TX), and the State of New York. The value of health department leadership for reducing new HIV infections and improving outcomes across the HIV care continuum was highlighted in a recent study to generate hypotheses to explain declines in HIV incidence in Massachusetts, North Carolina, San Francisco, and Seattle. Researchers found that the most unifying observation was that leadership within health departments is critical to achieving success. Continue reading

Parents Need Support to Prevent Youth Violence

By Alyssa Banks, Minneapolis Department of Health and Family Support, Minnesota

This story originally ran in NACCHO’s Stories from the Field.

Parent support group programs can be an effective strategy to teach caregivers necessary skills to better parent at-risk youth. Poor parenting can have many negative effects on families and children. For example, it can create a lack of communication in families and thus letting the children go down a path that is self-destructive or involved with violence. The Minneapolis Department of Health and Family Support has supported many parent support group programs through the City’s Blueprint for Action to Prevent Youth Violence initiative. These programs aim to strengthen families and help parents and caregivers to provide the best environment for healthy youth development. The programs are also particularly effective because they are culturally specific and focus on the unique needs of each community. Continue reading