Category Archives: environmental health

NACCHO Book Club — Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City

By Emily Yox, MPH, Global Health Program Analyst, NACCHO

Each month, we will bring you a new public health book, read and reviewed by NACCHO staff. We hope to provide a well-rounded reading list that you will find enjoyable as well as informative.

Our second book recommendation, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, was published in 2017 and written by sociologist Matthew Desmond. Evicted follows eight families as they struggle to find and maintain consistent housing in Milwaukee’s low-income rental market. As the book’s website states: “without a home, everything else falls apart.” Desmond explores both the political and cultural systems that create systemic poverty, the role that housing plays in this system, and the significant social and health effects that directly influence an individual’s ability to thrive. Continue reading

NACCHO Vector Control Collaborative: A Cinderella Story

By Bob Lamkin. Environmental Health Manager, Brazos County Health District (TX)

Brazos County, Texas, is home to Texas A&M University and a population of nearly 230,000. We have hot temperatures, high humidity and lots of mosquitoes.  Our Health District is small and our resources for a vector program have been limited.  However, we knew we wanted to help protect the citizens in our county from arboviruses. Continue reading

Minneapolis Environmental Health Awarded 2019 Crumbine Consumer Protection Award for Excellence in Food Protection

NACCHO recently announced Minneapolis Environmental Health as the recipient of the 2019 Samuel J. Crumbine Consumer Protection Award for Excellence in Food Protection at the Local Level. This award is given annually to local environmental health jurisdictions that demonstrate unsurpassed achievement in providing outstanding food protection services to their communities. Continue reading

Big Data Offers Big Insights into Links Between Environment, Heart Health

By Dr. Cavin Ward-Caviness, Principal Investigator (Computational Biologist), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, EPHD, CRB

This post originally appeared on the EPA blog.

Air Quality Awareness Week, April 29–May 3, is a perfect time to think about how far we have come in understanding how air pollution affects the cardiovascular system. As a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) scientist studying heart disease, I am very excited about current and future research in this area. Though the burden of heart disease on our society remains high (see the American Heart Association 2018 Statistics on Heart Disease and Stroke), we have only to look at the promising lines of current, cutting-edge research to find reasons to be optimistic about the progress we are making in our understanding and treatment of heart disease. Continue reading

Global Climate Change in Your Community: Take Action Now

By Grace McClain, Program Analyst, NACCHO

This story originally ran in NACCHO’s Essential Elements blog.

Global climate change may seem like a public health threat of the future, but many communities in the United States are feeling the health impacts of climate change today. Both geological and medical sciences have linked climate change to extreme weather events like hurricanes and wildfires, hotter temperatures, and a wider distribution of vector-borne diseases. Public health professionals need to brace themselves for a continued and escalating response on these fronts. Continue reading

Minneapolis Health Department Supports a Young Food Entrepreneur

By Dan Huff, Director of Environmental Health, and Gretchen Musicant, Commissioner of Health, Minneapolis Health Department

This story originally ran in NACCHO’s Essential Elements blog.

Jaequan Faulkner, 13, started selling hot dogs in front of his Minneapolis home in 2016, calling his establishment “Mr. Faulkner’s Old Fashioned Hot Dogs.” His food stand came back this summer bigger and better than before, and it grew popular with customers in the neighborhood. Continue reading

Taking Action to Address the Public Health Impact of Wildfire Smoke

By Alan Vette, Acting Director, Air and Energy National Research Program (ORD), United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Erika Sasser, Director, Health and Environmental Impacts Division (OAQPS), EPA

This story originally ran in NACCHO’s Essential Elements blog.

During Air Quality Awareness Week (April 30 – May 4), a focus on wildfire smoke is timely for public health because the 2018 wildfire season is about to begin for most of the U.S., and it has already started in some areas.

Exposure to wildfire smoke is a community health issue that has gained the attention of public health professionals and organizations, especially in states where fires are becoming more frequent and intense. Wildfire smoke has significant health implications for those near the fire as well as for those living farther downwind. Continue reading